Wor-Wic Receives $10,000 to Train Manufacturers
July 26, 2005

Wor-Wic Community College was recently awarded a $10,000 grant from the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development (DBED) to help area manufacturers obtain upgrade training for their employees.

The purpose of the grant is to make training more accessible to area manufacturing employees by helping to pay for a portion of their tuition. The grant will cover up to a maximum of $125 per approved course. The employer or student will cover the remaining cost.

“We hope to help an additional 80 manufacturing employees with this grant over the next year,” said Timothy R. Sherman, dean of occupational education. “Wor-Wic offers a broad range of computer-aided drafting, technical drafting, electronic and manufacturing courses to help area workers obtain training they need for the workplace.”

A total of 24 courses have been approved by DBED as part of the grant.

“Taking credit courses at Wor-Wic can lead to a letter of recognition, certificate of proficiency or associate degree,” Sherman explained. “We would like to see the students continue to take classes at Wor-Wic and work toward a degree, to provide a higher skilled labor force for local industry.”

The $10,000 awarded to Wor-Wic is part of a $50,000 grant awarded to the Technology and Innovation in Manufacturing Education (TIME) Center. Wor-Wic is a partner in the TIME Center, which is a collaboration of industry, government and educational institutions throughout Maryland. The TIME Center is funded by a $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation. Others receiving grant funds include Chesapeake College, the Community College of Baltimore County, the College of Southern Maryland and Harford Community College.

For more information about manufacturing training or the grant, call (410) 334-2828.


MANUFACTURING. Wor-Wic Community College was recently awarded a $10,000 grant from the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development (DBED) to help area manufacturers obtain upgrade training for their employees.

Donald C. Nicholson, left, technology department head and associate professor of manufacturing at Wor-Wic, explains to Jennifer Holland of Fruitland, a manufacturing student, how to operate an engine lathe during a manufacturing class at the manufacturing technology laboratory at Parkside High School in Salisbury.